Employing in New Zealand

Access and hire global talent & deploy them anywhere in the world by removing restrictions from only hiring from local markets.

Enter the New Zealand market without the requirement of opening a local entity.

Expanding into
New Zealand

Global expansion is a step to make for any business, regardless of what you wish to achieve. The opportunities that can come with an expansion can be both incredibly exciting as well as intimidating and confusing, especially when you consider all of the registration procedures that needs to be done and documentation required.

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Expanding to countries such as New Zealand – which is characterized by an innovate, international and reliable workforce, modest employment and tax laws, a robust infrastructure network connecting to the Pacific and beyond, and leading sectors in agriculture, horticulture, mining, fishing, finance, tourism, and tech – can bring both excitement to the possibilities, but also significant stress to ensuring the entity with the country’s rigorous legal structures and laws.

Ensuring compliance without the sufficient knowledge of the country’s laws also adds to the stress of getting your new entity off the ground and ready to test new markets. Going at it without the proper support can increase the costs, time and risks involved.

Each new markets bring new challenges, and these can be worked through more efficiently and cost-effectively with the support of an International Professional Employer Organization (PEO) such as Bradford Jacobs, especially through our Employer of Record (EOR) framework.

This can be best utilized when businesses are just beginning their expansion process and require more information before committing to incorporating an entity and fully establishing themselves in that market.

Country EOR Guide - Bradford Jacobs

Download our Guide to New Zealand

Learn all about expanding into New Zealand and see what we can do to make your expansion easier.

Download our Guide to New Zealand

Learn all about expanding into New Zealand and see what we can do to make your expansion easier.

Country EOR Guide - Bradford Jacobs

Hiring Staff
in New Zealand

Hiring Staff
in New Zealand

The Main Sectors of the New Zealand Economy

The country focuses on the following key sectors, which all have a significant impact on the country’s economy:

Horticulture in New Zealand makes up a big part of the agricultural sector. Most of the horticulturists major on fruits like peaches, plums, nectarines, drupe, cherries, and apricots.

Kiwifruit is the horticultural product with the highest export value in the country. New Zealand accounts for about a quarter of the world’s kiwifruit produce. Blackcurrants, grapes, and berries are also grown in the country. Avocados are also grown in the Bay of Plenty and Northland.

The agricultural sector is the largest industry in the country. Pastoral farming and horticulture make up most of the agricultural sector. Beef cattle rearing is practiced in Northland while dairy farming is the main activity in the wetlands of Taranaki, Northland, Southland, Manawatu, and Waikato areas.

Sheep farming is also practiced in many of the rural areas in the country, and the sheep are used for wool production and meat. Raw wool and wool products are exported.

New Zealand produces 2.2% of the global milk output ranking it the 8th among the world’s largest milk producers. The biggest milk processor in the country is Fonterra, and it processes about 95% of the milk from the farms. Other big dairy companies include Synlait, Westland Milk Products, and Tatua Co-operative Dairy Company. The cattle in the country feed on grass though they are fed hay during winter.

Venison is one of the country’s exports with New Zealand exporting the largest amount of farmed venison. Pigs and goat farming is also practiced but in smaller quantities. New Zealand is known worldwide for canned corned beef.

In 2021, $31.2b was made from New Zealand’s global food and beverage exports.

Forestry, though a small sector globally, contributes to 4% of the national GDP in New Zealand and timber accounts for a percentage of the exports in the agricultural sector. Plantation forests are located all around the country as the natural forests had started getting depleted.

Australia imports a big chunk of timber from New Zealand which is mostly used by the paper-making industries. Other importers include the US, Japan, China, and South Korea.

Fishing is one of the major industries in New Zealand, and their fishing territory is about 2.5 million square miles. The fishing zone is ranked sixth in size globally.

With the ninth-longest coastline of any country and ideal ocean temperatures, New Zealand’s aquaculture industry is one of the most efficient and sustainable forms of protein production on the planet.
New Zealand seafood products are exported to over 80 countries, and are prized for their high quality, with high demand from chefs around the world.

New Zealand currently has the fourth-highest renewable electricity percentage in the OECD, currently at around 84% and growing. Furthermore, the New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment estimates there is approximately 14,700 MW of potential additional capacity – providing ample scope for investment opportunities across the clean-energy value chain.

Prices are globally competitive, supported by New Zealand’s high annual average capacity factors of around 50% for hydro, up to 95% for geothermal, and 40% for wind (which is among the highest in the world).

New Zealand welcomed a record 3.8 million visitors in 2018, a 57 percent increase since 2009. Visitor numbers are forecast to reach 5.1 million a year by 2025. Tourism spending is also increasing, with a Government and industry focus on developing high-value attractions and year-round visitation. Domestic tourism also has a market value of $23.7 billion (TNZ, Domestic Tourism Insights May 2020).

The Main Sectors of the New Zealand Economy

The country focuses on the following key sectors, which all have a significant impact on the country’s economy:

Historic lighthouse at Cape Brett, New Zealand
Horticulture in New Zealand makes up a big part of the agricultural sector. Most of the horticulturists major on fruits like peaches, plums, nectarines, drupe, cherries, and apricots.

Kiwifruit is the horticultural product with the highest export value in the country. New Zealand accounts for about a quarter of the world’s kiwifruit produce. Blackcurrants, grapes, and berries are also grown in the country. Avocados are also grown in the Bay of Plenty and Northland.

The agricultural sector is the largest industry in the country. Pastoral farming and horticulture make up most of the agricultural sector. Beef cattle rearing is practiced in Northland while dairy farming is the main activity in the wetlands of Taranaki, Northland, Southland, Manawatu, and Waikato areas.

Sheep farming is also practiced in many of the rural areas in the country, and the sheep are used for wool production and meat. Raw wool and wool products are exported.

New Zealand produces 2.2% of the global milk output ranking it the 8th among the world’s largest milk producers. The biggest milk processor in the country is Fonterra, and it processes about 95% of the milk from the farms. Other big dairy companies include Synlait, Westland Milk Products, and Tatua Co-operative Dairy Company. The cattle in the country feed on grass though they are fed hay during winter.

Venison is one of the country’s exports with New Zealand exporting the largest amount of farmed venison. Pigs and goat farming is also practiced but in smaller quantities. New Zealand is known worldwide for canned corned beef.

In 2021, $31.2b was made from New Zealand’s global food and beverage exports.

Forestry, though a small sector globally, contributes to 4% of the national GDP in New Zealand and timber accounts for a percentage of the exports in the agricultural sector. Plantation forests are located all around the country as the natural forests had started getting depleted.

Australia imports a big chunk of timber from New Zealand which is mostly used by the paper-making industries. Other importers include the US, Japan, China, and South Korea.

Fishing is one of the major industries in New Zealand, and their fishing territory is about 2.5 million square miles. The fishing zone is ranked sixth in size globally.

With the ninth-longest coastline of any country and ideal ocean temperatures, New Zealand’s aquaculture industry is one of the most efficient and sustainable forms of protein production on the planet.
New Zealand seafood products are exported to over 80 countries, and are prized for their high quality, with high demand from chefs around the world.

New Zealand currently has the fourth-highest renewable electricity percentage in the OECD, currently at around 84% and growing. Furthermore, the New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment estimates there is approximately 14,700 MW of potential additional capacity – providing ample scope for investment opportunities across the clean-energy value chain.

Prices are globally competitive, supported by New Zealand’s high annual average capacity factors of around 50% for hydro, up to 95% for geothermal, and 40% for wind (which is among the highest in the world).

New Zealand welcomed a record 3.8 million visitors in 2018, a 57 percent increase since 2009. Visitor numbers are forecast to reach 5.1 million a year by 2025. Tourism spending is also increasing, with a Government and industry focus on developing high-value attractions and year-round visitation. Domestic tourism also has a market value of $23.7 billion (TNZ, Domestic Tourism Insights May 2020).

Commercial Laws in New Zealand

  • Inland Revenue (Te Tari Taake) – Inland Revenue plays a critical role in improving the economic and social wellbeing of New Zealanders. Inland Revenue collects 80% of the Crown’s revenue as well as collecting and disbursing social support program payments and providing the government with policy advice.
  • Employment New Zealand – Employment New Zealand is part of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. On their website, you will find practical, operational, and best practice employment information that will help employers and employees understand what they can do and how they should do it.
  • Labor Inspectorate – this authority works to ensure minimum employment standards are complied with, so that:
    • all employees receive their minimum employment rights
    • all employers operate in fair marketplaces free of non-compliant businesses that may have an unfair advantage.

The Labor Inspectorate ensures compliance with employment standards by identifying and investigating breaches and taking enforcement action. The Inspectorate provides early resolution assistance for some complaints about breaches of employment standards. It also works with industry and sector leadership and other key parties to strengthen the systems that underpin employment standards compliance.

In New Zealand, an employment contract, or employment agreement, must be concluded in writing. The agreement could either be a collective agreement (which is between employees, employers, and unions), or an individual contract (which is between an employee and employer), which can be indefinite or fixed term. Here are the conditions of each agreement:

  • An individual contract (indefinite or fixed-term) – an individual contract is the best type for employees that are not involved a trade union or collective agreement, or where one is not involved and must be treated as an individual. This type of employment agreement must include:
    • the names of the employer and the employee
    • a description of the work to be performed
    • an indication of the place of work and the agreed hours
    • the wage rate or salary, and how it will be paid
    • an explanation on how to help resolve employment relationship problems, such as advice that personal grievances must be raised within 90 days
    • statement of public holiday payments (if needed), which must be at least time and a half (150%) for work done on those days
    • protection in cases of restructuring

For more information on labour contracts law in New Zealand Download our New Zealand Country Guide…

Income Tax: In New Zealand, an individual’s liability to pay income tax is determined by their residency, as well as the source of their income. Residents are taxed on their worldwide income, whilst non-residents are subject to tax only on income from sources in New Zealand.

Taxable income includes:

  • Income from salaries, wages, or self-employed work
  • Benefits and student allowances
  • Assets and investments such as KiwiSaver and rental income
  • Overseas income

New Zealand’s tax system is based on self-assessment – individuals’ income tax is normally withheld by employers and paid directly to the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) monthly on the employees’ behalf.

However, individual tax returns are still required, and the following tax forms are sent to the individual to confirm or modify the tax assessments for the previous year – a tax assessment form, a request to confirm or provide new information about your income, as well as a message to complete an individual tax return (which can be received by post or online via myIR).

For more information on tax contributions and benefits in New Zealand Download our New Zealand Country Guide…

Commercial Laws in New Zealand

Auckland City Skyline - New Zealand
  • Inland Revenue (Te Tari Taake) – Inland Revenue plays a critical role in improving the economic and social wellbeing of New Zealanders. Inland Revenue collects 80% of the Crown’s revenue as well as collecting and disbursing social support program payments and providing the government with policy advice.
  • Employment New Zealand – Employment New Zealand is part of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. On their website, you will find practical, operational, and best practice employment information that will help employers and employees understand what they can do and how they should do it.
  • Labor Inspectorate – this authority works to ensure minimum employment standards are complied with, so that:
    • all employees receive their minimum employment rights
    • all employers operate in fair marketplaces free of non-compliant businesses that may have an unfair advantage.

The Labor Inspectorate ensures compliance with employment standards by identifying and investigating breaches and taking enforcement action. The Inspectorate provides early resolution assistance for some complaints about breaches of employment standards. It also works with industry and sector leadership and other key parties to strengthen the systems that underpin employment standards compliance.

In New Zealand, an employment contract, or employment agreement, must be concluded in writing. The agreement could either be a collective agreement (which is between employees, employers, and unions), or an individual contract (which is between an employee and employer), which can be indefinite or fixed term. Here are the conditions of each agreement:

  • An individual contract (indefinite or fixed-term) – an individual contract is the best type for employees that are not involved a trade union or collective agreement, or where one is not involved and must be treated as an individual. This type of employment agreement must include:
    • the names of the employer and the employee
    • a description of the work to be performed
    • an indication of the place of work and the agreed hours
    • the wage rate or salary, and how it will be paid
    • an explanation on how to help resolve employment relationship problems, such as advice that personal grievances must be raised within 90 days
    • statement of public holiday payments (if needed), which must be at least time and a half (150%) for work done on those days
    • protection in cases of restructuring

For more information on labour contracts law in New Zealand Download our New Zealand Country Guide…

Income Tax: In New Zealand, an individual’s liability to pay income tax is determined by their residency, as well as the source of their income. Residents are taxed on their worldwide income, whilst non-residents are subject to tax only on income from sources in New Zealand.

Taxable income includes:

  • Income from salaries, wages, or self-employed work
  • Benefits and student allowances
  • Assets and investments such as KiwiSaver and rental income
  • Overseas income

New Zealand’s tax system is based on self-assessment – individuals’ income tax is normally withheld by employers and paid directly to the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) monthly on the employees’ behalf.

However, individual tax returns are still required, and the following tax forms are sent to the individual to confirm or modify the tax assessments for the previous year – a tax assessment form, a request to confirm or provide new information about your income, as well as a message to complete an individual tax return (which can be received by post or online via myIR).

For more information on tax contributions and benefits in New Zealand Download our New Zealand Country Guide…

FAQ

An Employer of Record (EOR) in New Zealand is a service that allows companies to hire employees in New Zealand without needing to establish a local entity. The EOR becomes the legal employer for tax and compliance purposes while the client company retains control over the employees’ work tasks and responsibilities. This setup simplifies the process of entering the New Zealand market, handling local employment laws, payroll, and tax obligations on behalf of the company. This service is particularly beneficial for companies aiming for rapid market entry and operational start-up without navigating complex local regulations.

In New Zealand, you can hire talent using a combination of talent acquisition strategies and an Employer of Record (EOR) service. Talent acquisition involves recruiting skilled workers directly, through various visa categories like the Skilled Migrant Visa or the Work to Residence Visa. Meanwhile, using an EOR service simplifies the employment process by managing compliance, payroll, and legal responsibilities without needing to establish a local entity. This integrated approach helps efficiently navigate the hiring landscape.

Managing payroll in New Zealand can be handled through several methods, including internal payroll for subsidiaries, remote payroll systems linked to a parent company, and outsourcing to local payroll providers. Companies can also use Employer of Record (EOR) services to manage payroll compliance and administration. These services include registering with local tax authorities, managing wage tax and social security contributions, and handling employment contracts and payroll processing.

In New Zealand, hiring employees does not necessarily require establishing a local entity. Companies can use an Employer of Record (EOR) to legally hire staff without the need for a subsidiary. This allows businesses to operate more flexibly and quickly in the New Zealand market while the EOR handles local legal and compliance issues.

FAQ

An Employer of Record (EOR) in New Zealand is a service that allows companies to hire employees in New Zealand without needing to establish a local entity. The EOR becomes the legal employer for tax and compliance purposes while the client company retains control over the employees’ work tasks and responsibilities. This setup simplifies the process of entering the New Zealand market, handling local employment laws, payroll, and tax obligations on behalf of the company. This service is particularly beneficial for companies aiming for rapid market entry and operational start-up without navigating complex local regulations.

In New Zealand, you can hire talent using a combination of talent acquisition strategies and an Employer of Record (EOR) service. Talent acquisition involves recruiting skilled workers directly, through various visa categories like the Skilled Migrant Visa or the Work to Residence Visa. Meanwhile, using an EOR service simplifies the employment process by managing compliance, payroll, and legal responsibilities without needing to establish a local entity. This integrated approach helps efficiently navigate the hiring landscape.

Managing payroll in New Zealand can be handled through several methods, including internal payroll for subsidiaries, remote payroll systems linked to a parent company, and outsourcing to local payroll providers. Companies can also use Employer of Record (EOR) services to manage payroll compliance and administration. These services include registering with local tax authorities, managing wage tax and social security contributions, and handling employment contracts and payroll processing.

In New Zealand, hiring employees does not necessarily require establishing a local entity. Companies can use an Employer of Record (EOR) to legally hire staff without the need for a subsidiary. This allows businesses to operate more flexibly and quickly in the New Zealand market while the EOR handles local legal and compliance issues.

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