Employing in Canada

Access and hire global talent & deploy them anywhere in the world by removing restrictions from only hiring from local markets.

Enter the Canadian market without the requirement of opening a local entity.

Expanding into
Canada

Global expansion is a step to make for any business, regardless of what you wish to achieve. The opportunities that can come with an expansion can be both incredibly exciting as well as intimidating and confusing, especially when you consider all of the registration procedures that needs to be done and documentation required.

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Expanding to countries such as Canada – which is characterized by a highly-talented and diverse workforce, multilayered employment and tax laws, a robust infrastructure network with leading sectors in manufacturing, services, agriculture, natural resources, technology, and mining – can bring both excitement to the possibilities, but also significant stress to ensuring the entity with the country’s rigorous legal structures and laws.

Ensuring compliance without the sufficient knowledge of the country’s laws also adds to the stress of getting your new entity off the ground and ready to test new markets. Going at it without the proper support can increase the costs, time and risks involved.

Each new markets bring new challenges, and these can be worked through more efficiently and cost-effectively with the support of an International Professional Employer Organization (PEO) such as Bradford Jacobs, especially through our Employer of Record (EOR) framework.

This can be best utilized when businesses are just beginning their expansion process and require more information before committing to incorporating an entity and fully establishing themselves in that market.

Country EOR Guide - Bradford Jacobs

Download our Guide to Canada

Learn all about expanding into Canada and see what we can do to make your expansion easier.

Download our Guide to Canada

Learn all about expanding into Canada and see what we can do to make your expansion easier.

Country EOR Guide - Bradford Jacobs

Hiring Staff
in Canada

Hiring Staff in Canada

The Main Sectors of the Canadian Economy

The country focuses on the following key sectors, which all have a significant impact on the country’s economy:

This sector accounts for 75% of Canadian jobs and 78% of the country’s GDP. Canada’s service industry includes the following sectors: transportation, economic, health care, construction, banking, communication, retail, tourism, and government.

As a vital part of the Canadian economy, the most popular sector is retail, with some big franchise names including Walmart and Future Shop.

Manufacturing in Canada accounts for approximately $174bn in the GDP, more than 10% of the total GDP of the entire country. Thanks to this, 1.7 million jobs are kept and maintained through many of the main manufacturing industries in Canada.

Manufacturing industries themselves have become more industrialized over the years, with higher technologies and innovations brought to the sector with the help of researchers, programmers, engineers, and tradespeople.

When it comes to wheat and grains, Canada has it covered. Canada is one of the largest suppliers of agricultural products in the world. Due to its strategic location, Canada exports most of its crops to its big brother of the south, America.

As part of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Canada practices fair trading and ensures that whatever is put on the market agriculturally doesn’t have any influence on the price of crops in other countries.

Canada’s agricultural sector is steadily growing every year and accounts for 8% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product.

Canada is home to the world’s largest tech hubs, growing and attracting innovative talent from across the globe. There are over 43,000 tech companies registered in Canada, which contribute around 1.65 million jobs.

The ICT sector contributes substantially to Canada’s GDP. In 2020, the sector’s GDP was $96.8 billion (in 2012 constant dollars), accounting for 5.1% of national GDP, continuing a trend of taking a higher share of national GDP. The ICT sector is also responsible for 27.2% of national GDP growth between 2015 and 2020.

The Toronto-Waterloo Corridor is also the largest tech cluster in North America outside of Silicon Valley.

As the second-largest country in the world, Canada is largely underpopulated and offers a vast source of natural resources. The sector is driven largely by forestry, fishing, agriculture, mining, and energy sectors.

Canada is the world’s 8th largest exporter of agricultural products including grains, oil seeds, and specialty crops. Government spending in support of research and development in this sector has increased in recent years.

The oil and gas markets in Canada are a lucrative business, with the world’s 3rd largest proven crude oil reserves and 18th largest proven natural gas reserves at their disposal. 35% of the world’s oil and gas companies reside in Alberta, Canada.

Forests are a major source of wealth for Canadians, providing a wide range of economic, social, and environmental benefits.

In 2013, production in the forest sector contributed $19.8 billion—or 1.25%—to Canada’s real gross domestic product (GDP). In a global context, Canada has the world’s largest forest product trade balance—C$19.3 billion (2013)—a position it has held for as long as trustworthy trade statistics have been compiled.

The mining industry in Canada has grown exponentially in recent years, with many job opportunities opening up to local and foreign workers. There are currently over 800 mines across Canada, employing more than 363,000 workers. The country ranks as the top producer of potash and uranium, with a ranking in the top 5 for nickel and diamonds.

The mining industry now accounts for 5% of the country’s GDP and relies heavily on the continuous improvement of machinery and practices in the sector. Cutting edge technology is developed on a constant basis, ensuring that Canada is at the forefront of the mining industry on a global scale.

The Main Sectors of the Canadian Economy

The country focuses on the following key sectors, which all have a significant impact on the country’s economy:

Autumn Sunset at Lake Moraine in Banff National Park, Canada
This sector accounts for 75% of Canadian jobs and 78% of the country’s GDP. Canada’s service industry includes the following sectors: transportation, economic, health care, construction, banking, communication, retail, tourism, and government.

As a vital part of the Canadian economy, the most popular sector is retail, with some big franchise names including Walmart and Future Shop.

Manufacturing in Canada accounts for approximately $174bn in the GDP, more than 10% of the total GDP of the entire country. Thanks to this, 1.7 million jobs are kept and maintained through many of the main manufacturing industries in Canada.

Manufacturing industries themselves have become more industrialized over the years, with higher technologies and innovations brought to the sector with the help of researchers, programmers, engineers, and tradespeople.

When it comes to wheat and grains, Canada has it covered. Canada is one of the largest suppliers of agricultural products in the world. Due to its strategic location, Canada exports most of its crops to its big brother of the south, America.

As part of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Canada practices fair trading and ensures that whatever is put on the market agriculturally doesn’t have any influence on the price of crops in other countries.

Canada’s agricultural sector is steadily growing every year and accounts for 8% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product.

Canada is home to the world’s largest tech hubs, growing and attracting innovative talent from across the globe. There are over 43,000 tech companies registered in Canada, which contribute around 1.65 million jobs.

The ICT sector contributes substantially to Canada’s GDP. In 2020, the sector’s GDP was $96.8 billion (in 2012 constant dollars), accounting for 5.1% of national GDP, continuing a trend of taking a higher share of national GDP. The ICT sector is also responsible for 27.2% of national GDP growth between 2015 and 2020.

The Toronto-Waterloo Corridor is also the largest tech cluster in North America outside of Silicon Valley.

As the second-largest country in the world, Canada is largely underpopulated and offers a vast source of natural resources. The sector is driven largely by forestry, fishing, agriculture, mining, and energy sectors.

Canada is the world’s 8th largest exporter of agricultural products including grains, oil seeds, and specialty crops. Government spending in support of research and development in this sector has increased in recent years.

The oil and gas markets in Canada are a lucrative business, with the world’s 3rd largest proven crude oil reserves and 18th largest proven natural gas reserves at their disposal. 35% of the world’s oil and gas companies reside in Alberta, Canada.

Forests are a major source of wealth for Canadians, providing a wide range of economic, social, and environmental benefits.

In 2013, production in the forest sector contributed $19.8 billion—or 1.25%—to Canada’s real gross domestic product (GDP). In a global context, Canada has the world’s largest forest product trade balance—C$19.3 billion (2013)—a position it has held for as long as trustworthy trade statistics have been compiled.

The mining industry in Canada has grown exponentially in recent years, with many job opportunities opening up to local and foreign workers. There are currently over 800 mines across Canada, employing more than 363,000 workers. The country ranks as the top producer of potash and uranium, with a ranking in the top 5 for nickel and diamonds.

The mining industry now accounts for 5% of the country’s GDP and relies heavily on the continuous improvement of machinery and practices in the sector. Cutting edge technology is developed on a constant basis, ensuring that Canada is at the forefront of the mining industry on a global scale.

Commercial Laws in Canada

  • Canada Revenue Agency – Administers tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories. They also administer various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system.
  • Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) – works to improve the standard of living and quality of life for all Canadians. They also have a Labor Program, which is responsible for protecting the rights and well-being of both workers and employers in federally regulated workplaces. We work closely with the following parties to promote fair, safe, and productive workplaces, and collaborative workplace relations:
    • provincial and territorial governments
    • unions
    • employers
    • international partners
    • other stakeholders
International companies hiring employees as part of their expansion into Canada must comply with federal regulations, as well as those applying in Canada’s 10 provinces and three territories. Legally, employment contracts can be verbal or in writing, but written versions are advisable in dealing with complex terms covering such as pensions, compensation and benefits, or any confidentiality or intellectual property issues.

Contracts are generally full-time /open-ended, although fixed-term agreements are allowed, but can come with fewer guarantees such as terms of notice.

Canadian employment laws protect all workers, including foreign employees whose terms of employment must comply with what is permitted in their visa or work permit.

Federal, provincial, and territorial rules cover payroll, tax, social insurance, and benefits including minimum wages, working hours, overtime, and maternity leave. Statutory minimums apply in most case, at federal and regional levels.

For more information on labour contracts law in Canada Download our Canada Country Guide…

Income Tax: Canada’s income tax system is graduated, meaning low-income earners are taxed at a lower percentage than high earners. Canadian residents are taxed on their worldwide income.

Taxpayers pay income tax to the federal government and to the government of the province/territory where they live. In all provinces/territories, except Québec, the federal government collects the provincial/territorial tax and passes it to those authorities to fund various programs. The provinces and territories apply their own tax rates and bands.

In Canada, taxpayers pay income tax to the federal government and to the government of the province/territory where they reside. The government collects both federal and provincial taxes on behalf of the Canada Revenue Agency.

The tax year ends on December 31 and under the self-assessment system returns are due by April 15. In all provinces/territories, except Québec, the federal government collects the provincial/territorial tax and gives it back to them in the form of various programs.

For more information on tax contributions and benefits Download our Canada Country Guide…

Commercial Laws in Canada

Vancouver corporate city buildings, Canada
  • Canada Revenue Agency – Administers tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories. They also administer various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system.
  • Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) – works to improve the standard of living and quality of life for all Canadians. They also have a Labor Program, which is responsible for protecting the rights and well-being of both workers and employers in federally regulated workplaces. We work closely with the following parties to promote fair, safe, and productive workplaces, and collaborative workplace relations:
    • provincial and territorial governments
    • unions
    • employers
    • international partners
    • other stakeholders
International companies hiring employees as part of their expansion into Canada must comply with federal regulations, as well as those applying in Canada’s 10 provinces and three territories. Legally, employment contracts can be verbal or in writing, but written versions are advisable in dealing with complex terms covering such as pensions, compensation and benefits, or any confidentiality or intellectual property issues.

Contracts are generally full-time /open-ended, although fixed-term agreements are allowed, but can come with fewer guarantees such as terms of notice.

Canadian employment laws protect all workers, including foreign employees whose terms of employment must comply with what is permitted in their visa or work permit.

Federal, provincial, and territorial rules cover payroll, tax, social insurance, and benefits including minimum wages, working hours, overtime, and maternity leave. Statutory minimums apply in most case, at federal and regional levels.

For more information on labour contracts law in Canada Download our Canada Country Guide…

Income Tax: Canada’s income tax system is graduated, meaning low-income earners are taxed at a lower percentage than high earners. Canadian residents are taxed on their worldwide income.

Taxpayers pay income tax to the federal government and to the government of the province/territory where they live. In all provinces/territories, except Québec, the federal government collects the provincial/territorial tax and passes it to those authorities to fund various programs. The provinces and territories apply their own tax rates and bands.

In Canada, taxpayers pay income tax to the federal government and to the government of the province/territory where they reside. The government collects both federal and provincial taxes on behalf of the Canada Revenue Agency.

The tax year ends on December 31 and under the self-assessment system returns are due by April 15. In all provinces/territories, except Québec, the federal government collects the provincial/territorial tax and gives it back to them in the form of various programs.

For more information on tax contributions and benefits Download our Canada Country Guide…

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