Employing in Malta

Access and hire global talent & deploy them anywhere in the world by removing restrictions from only hiring from local markets.

Enter the Maltese market without the requirement of opening a local entity.

Expanding into
Malta

Expanding into Malta can bring many opportunities. The country is characterised by a skilled and international workforce, favourable employment and tax laws, and a durable infrastructure network that prides itself on being a strong maritime link between European, African, and Asian markets. Tourism, electronics, construction, and information technology services are the leading sectors of the Maltese economy.

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Global Expansion is a step to make for any business, regardless of your goal. But the opportunities that can come with an expansion can be stimulating as well as intimidating and confusing, especially when you consider all of the registration procedures that need to be done and the documentation required.

Going at it without the proper support can increase the costs, time and risks involved.

The legwork and potential red tape can be worked through more efficiently and cost-effectively with the support of a Professional Employer Organisation (PEO) such as Bradford Jacobs, primarily through our Employer of Record (EOR) framework.

It can be best utilised when businesses are just beginning their expansion process and require more information before incorporating an entity and fully establishing themselves in the Maltese market.

Country EOR Guide - Bradford Jacobs

Download our Guide to Malta

Learn all about expanding into Malta and see what we can do to make your expansion easier.

Download our Guide to Malta

Learn all about expanding into Malta and see what we can do to make your expansion easier.

Country EOR Guide - Bradford Jacobs

Hiring Staff
in Malta

Hiring Staff
in Malta

The Main Sectors of the Maltese Economy

The country focuses on the following key sectors, which all have a significant impact on the country’s economy:

Tourism is among the primary contributors to Malta’s GDP. Tourism accounts for about 27.1% of Malta’s GDP, significantly higher than Europe’s 10.3%. This sector also employs about 3/5 of the country’s workforce. The sector follows a seasonal pattern, with June-October being the peak season. This sector also significantly impacts Malta’s natural environment of the Maltese islands, with plans for the government to promote ecotourism.
The manufacturing sector has been long-established since the country’s days as a British colony. Before independence, the industry mainly revolved around local beverages, food, and furniture. However, after gaining independence, the country re-established itself as a low-cost manufacturing hub to attract foreign investors. Manufacturing accounts for 11% of Malta’s employment and 10% of Malta’s GDP, with electronics and F&B being dominant in the sector. Most manufacturing companies are located in the country’s industrial parks, benefiting from subsidised production costs such as cheap electricity and tax incentives on raw materials.
The fastest growing sector of the Maltese economy. The final services sector accounts for 12% of the GDP and employs over 10,000 people. Malta is also internationally recognised as a world-class centre for blue-chip banks, investment houses, and fund managers.
Malta is located in the centre of the Mediterranean, only a few miles off one of the busiest global shipping lanes. It also boasts one of the largest merchant ship registers and a solid reputation as a flag of quality. This sector is supported by a robust infrastructural base, which hosts one of the largest trans-shipment hubs in the Mediterranean (Malta Freeport), a vibrant commercial harbour that hosts cargo operations and ship repair facilities, and a cruise liner terminal.
A sector with a strong foundation and great potential. Malta is known as a centre for teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). What most don’t know, however, is that Malta also has a strong presence of specialised institutions that provide training for the oil and gas sector and several international universities with various services.

The Main Sectors of the Maltese Economy

The country focuses on the following key sectors, which all have a significant impact on the country’s economy:

Tourism is among the primary contributors to Malta’s GDP. Tourism accounts for about 27.1% of Malta’s GDP, significantly higher than Europe’s 10.3%. This sector also employs about 3/5 of the country’s workforce. The sector follows a seasonal pattern, with June-October being the peak season. This sector also significantly impacts Malta’s natural environment of the Maltese islands, with plans for the government to promote ecotourism.
The manufacturing sector has been long-established since the country’s days as a British colony. Before independence, the industry mainly revolved around local beverages, food, and furniture. However, after gaining independence, the country re-established itself as a low-cost manufacturing hub to attract foreign investors. Manufacturing accounts for 11% of Malta’s employment and 10% of Malta’s GDP, with electronics and F&B being dominant in the sector. Most manufacturing companies are located in the country’s industrial parks, benefiting from subsidised production costs such as cheap electricity and tax incentives on raw materials.
The fastest growing sector of the Maltese economy. The final services sector accounts for 12% of the GDP and employs over 10,000 people. Malta is also internationally recognised as a world-class centre for blue-chip banks, investment houses, and fund managers.
Malta is located in the centre of the Mediterranean, only a few miles off one of the busiest global shipping lanes. It also boasts one of the largest merchant ship registers and a solid reputation as a flag of quality. This sector is supported by a robust infrastructural base, which hosts one of the largest trans-shipment hubs in the Mediterranean (Malta Freeport), a vibrant commercial harbour that hosts cargo operations and ship repair facilities, and a cruise liner terminal.
A sector with a strong foundation and great potential. Malta is known as a centre for teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). What most don’t know, however, is that Malta also has a strong presence of specialised institutions that provide training for the oil and gas sector and several international universities with various services.

Commercial Laws in
Malta

In Malta, contracts need not necessarily be in writing. However, under the Information to Employees Regulations, a written agreement of basic details must be presented to the employee by eight days after the commencement of the employment if this latter is intended to last longer than one month with more than eight hours of work per week. Some key factors include:

  • Detailing whether the contract is permanent or fixed and whether a probation period (not to exceed six months) is involved.
  • Start date.
  • Remuneration and benefits, guaranteeing at least the National Minimum Wage.
  • Social conditions such as sick pay, maternity, and parental leave.
  • Notice periods, termination, and dismissal policy.
  • Frequency of pay and overtime payments cannot exceed four weeks in arrears.
  • Working hours, job description and location of employment.
  • Procedure for breach of contract.
  • Annual paid leave
  • Contracts must be signed by both parties, which must be over 18 years old.
  • There is no legal requirement regarding language, but both parties must understand it.

Tax Authorities

  • The Commissioner for Revenue – previously known as the Inland Revenue Department, this office collects taxes from individuals and businesses in a fair, timely and efficient manner to ensure that funds are available for Malta’s public services.
  • Tax Compliance Unit – a semi-autonomous specialised unit within Malta’s Finance Ministry that aims to address and tackle tax evasion and fraud. The role and functions of this unit complement and support the enforcement capacities of the Inland Revenue Department, the VAT Department, and the Customs Department.

Labour Authorities

  • Department of Industrial and Employment Relations – the contact point for people and employers regarding Maltese employment. The main activities of this department are employment conditions, industrial relations (such as regulations between employment associations & trade unions), and international labour regulations (such as collaboration with the EU and other International Labour Organizations).

Commercial Laws in
Malta

In Malta, contracts need not necessarily be in writing. However, under the Information to Employees Regulations, a written agreement of basic details must be presented to the employee by eight days after the commencement of the employment if this latter is intended to last longer than one month with more than eight hours of work per week. Some key factors include:

  • Detailing whether the contract is permanent or fixed and whether a probation period (not to exceed six months) is involved.
  • Start date.
  • Remuneration and benefits, guaranteeing at least the National Minimum Wage.
  • Social conditions such as sick pay, maternity, and parental leave.
  • Notice periods, termination, and dismissal policy.
  • Frequency of pay and overtime payments cannot exceed four weeks in arrears.
  • Working hours, job description and location of employment.
  • Procedure for breach of contract.
  • Annual paid leave
  • Contracts must be signed by both parties, which must be over 18 years old.
  • There is no legal requirement regarding language, but both parties must understand it.

Tax Authorities

  • The Commissioner for Revenue – previously known as the Inland Revenue Department, this office collects taxes from individuals and businesses in a fair, timely and efficient manner to ensure that funds are available for Malta’s public services.
  • Tax Compliance Unit – a semi-autonomous specialised unit within Malta’s Finance Ministry that aims to address and tackle tax evasion and fraud. The role and functions of this unit complement and support the enforcement capacities of the Inland Revenue Department, the VAT Department, and the Customs Department.

Labour Authorities

  • Department of Industrial and Employment Relations – the contact point for people and employers regarding Maltese employment. The main activities of this department are employment conditions, industrial relations (such as regulations between employment associations & trade unions), and international labour regulations (such as collaboration with the EU and other International Labour Organizations).

FAQ

An Employer of Record (EOR) in Malta is a service that allows companies to hire employees in Malta without establishing a legal entity there. Essentially, the EOR acts as the official employer, handling payroll, taxes, benefits, and other HR functions on behalf of the hiring company. This arrangement can be beneficial for businesses looking to expand their operations into Malta without navigating the complexities of local employment laws and regulations.

To hire talent in Malta, you can leverage the country’s highly skilled workforce and utilise recruitment agencies. Combining talent acquisition with an Employer of Record (EOR) service streamlines the process by providing access to local expertise, handling legal and administrative requirements, and offering flexibility in hiring without establishing a legal entity.

To manage payroll in Malta, you can use payroll services offered by Bradford Jacobs. These services ensure compliance with Maltese payroll regulations, handle payroll processing, including calculations, deductions, and filings, and provide support for employee benefits administration. Additionally, we offer expertise in navigating local tax laws and regulations, ensuring accurate and timely payroll management for businesses operating in Malta.

To hire talent in Malta, you typically don’t need to establish a legal entity in the country. Using an Employer of Record (EOR) service, allows you to hire employees without setting up a subsidiary or legal entity in Malta. This approach simplifies the process, as the EOR manages payroll, taxes, benefits, and other HR functions on behalf of your company, enabling you to recruit talent in Malta without the need for a local entity.

FAQ

An Employer of Record (EOR) in Malta is a service that allows companies to hire employees in Malta without establishing a legal entity there. Essentially, the EOR acts as the official employer, handling payroll, taxes, benefits, and other HR functions on behalf of the hiring company. This arrangement can be beneficial for businesses looking to expand their operations into Malta without navigating the complexities of local employment laws and regulations.

To hire talent in Malta, you can leverage the country’s highly skilled workforce and utilise recruitment agencies. Combining talent acquisition with an Employer of Record (EOR) service streamlines the process by providing access to local expertise, handling legal and administrative requirements, and offering flexibility in hiring without establishing a legal entity.

To manage payroll in Malta, you can use payroll services offered by Bradford Jacobs. These services ensure compliance with Maltese payroll regulations, handle payroll processing, including calculations, deductions, and filings, and provide support for employee benefits administration. Additionally, we offer expertise in navigating local tax laws and regulations, ensuring accurate and timely payroll management for businesses operating in Malta.

To hire talent in Malta, you typically don’t need to establish a legal entity in the country. Using an Employer of Record (EOR) service, allows you to hire employees without setting up a subsidiary or legal entity in Malta. This approach simplifies the process, as the EOR manages payroll, taxes, benefits, and other HR functions on behalf of your company, enabling you to recruit talent in Malta without the need for a local entity.

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